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Past Exhibits

"Interior Changer" by Joe Feddersen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joe Feddersen, Transitions
Sept. 24 - Nov. 2, 2012

The grand opening of the MAC Gallery in September 2012 featured the exhibition "Transitions" by renowned artist and WVC graduate Joe Feddersen.

Feddersen was a student at WVC during the 1970s, studying printmaking with Robert Graves in the ascendant art department. After receiving degrees from the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he taught for two decades at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, exhibiting his work in major museums and galleries throughout the world. He recently retired from Evergreen and returned to his hometown of Omak, where he continues to ambitiously produce and exhibit work.

"Transitions" included wall-hung pieces utilizing a variety of printmaking techniques, as well as sculptural vessels of blown glass, all mixing elements that blur the lines between Feddersen's traditional culture and contemporary imagery. The exhibition features a six-foot by 12-foot, multi-paneled print piece titled "Okanogan 1," and delicate, new mirrored glass works.

 

 In the Recesses by Vicki DeRooy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Vicki DeRooy, My Life in Prismacolor
Jan. 4 through Jan. 28, 2013

Artist Statement:

In my most recent work, I am attempting to put down on paper a story of my life, an introspective recognition of SELF, myself. I use Prismacolor colored pencil and a smooth black acid-free paper as the tools to express this idea. I look for balance in the pieces, just as I struggle for balance in myself and in my life. I use a few familiar images as symbols, but what these symbols represent can change from one drawing to the next. There are, however, some common themes, having to do in some way with my desire for a pragmatic approach to my life. Some prevalent themes found in the work are life and death, spirituality, reality vs. non-reality, and memories that have in some ways dissolved or changed beyond accurate recollection.

Color plays a significant role in the life of my work. I love the intensity and the luminosity of colors. I also love to play with light and shadow, working together to represent something tangible, reachable, yet indefinable. The play of pattern is another commonly used element in my work. Pattern has a language and a structure that I feel helps to carry my voice and define the content of the drawings.

 
 Talking Orchid artwork by Majka Sadel  
Majka Sadel, Talking Orchid
Feb. 1 through Feb. 28, 2013

Majka Sadel's exhibit includes ink and mixed media works on paper.

Majka currently teaches Art History and Art Appreciation courses at Wenatchee Valley College. She is an active, practicing studio artist with a master's in fine arts from painting, and she has classical academic art training from Poland, where she was born and raised.

Majka uses ink and non-traditional media to explore a variety of expressive and lyrical responses to her potted companions.

Scott Bailey's 5.1.12H image
Scott Bailey, Topometry, Topology, Topography
March 1 through March 29, 2013
Scott Bailey, WVC Art Department Director, takes a hard look at the local landscape, exploring form and color through new materials and processes. Three-dimensional paintings result from a combination of contemporary technologies, non-traditional materials, painting sensibilities and gravity.
Image by Karen Dawn Dean
Karen Dawn Dean and Niki Stewart: ART 220
April 5 through April 30, 2013

WVC art students Niki Stewart and Karen Dawn Dean filled the MAC Gallery with paintings, installation, and performance. Collectively, their works showed evidence of transformation: from figuration to abstraction, from craft to fine art, and from object to experience.

The genesis of the exhibition arose when the artists found themselves together in an Advanced Painting class and conceived of a show that challenged themselves and a lifetime of their own artistic conventions. This work provides examples of the kind of mature exploration occurring in WVC's advanced art classes.

Bryan Miller Reassemble image
Bryan Miller: Reassemble
May 3 to May 31, 2013

Artist Statement: I begin as I always have, and where my work always seems to end: with materials. I am fascinated by the intersection of the way we view the world around us and the physicality of the material world. The physical world and its forms determine how and what we are capable of thinking and seeing. It is with this in mind that I build abstract and concrete structures to live and interact with. By disassembling and reassembling materials, I find significance in form. By placing these objects in a space, I learn how those forms affect our function.

This exhibit demonstrates the creative process.

Rae Dana artwork
Remembering Rae Dana
October 2013
The WVC Art Department remembered artist and instructor Rae Dana with a collection of paintings, prints and drawings that showed the broad range of her talents and expression. Her abstract works are rich and lyrical, drawing inspiration especially from the landscape. The exhibition featured a written statement by WVC English faculty Derek Sheffield.

Camlin, Water Fragment image

Richman, Spill One image











 

 

 

Cynthia Camlin and Elise Richman: Each Form Overflows its Present
November-December, 2013

Cynthia Camlin and Elise Richman are professors of painting at Western Washington University and the University of Puget Sound (respectively). While taking dramatically different approaches, both of their works display a strong sensitivity to the history and material qualities of the medium of painting, along with a conceptual framework that refers to contemporary ecological concerns.

Both artists engage in painterly processes that evoke water, ice, and geological processes. In each artist's work, the material potential of paint acts as a metaphor for distinct aspects of the material world.

Camlin captures ice's crystalline structure and the primordial depths of ice shelves. Her frozen landscapes explore relationships between abstract and naturalistic visual languages while conveying environmental concerns. Layering opaque and transparent color, solid and liquid form, the paintings rely on correlatives for temperature and material processes that we observe in the world or our own bodies. If it is a world in these paintings, that world is in pieces, loosening and shifting.

Richman's process driven work similarly represents perceptual phenomena to communicate ecological content. She depicts water and references the local marine environment in order to express interconnectedness as well as accelerated states of flux. Relative drying times and levels of fluidity versus viscosity create different surfaces that reflect the tactile, physicality of the material world. Her paintings represent and embody the fluid nature of boundaries, reflecting phenomena that operate on visual, physical, environmental, and social levels.

 

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 MAC Gallery
Wenatchee Valley College Music and Art Center
1300 Fifth Street, Wenatchee, WA  98801

 


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