Research by Subject: Genealogy

  
   Immigration & Migration Resources
     
 

WVC Library Home Page > Research by Subject Menu >  Immigration & Migration

 


The migration pages are "under construction"
due to a change in software they are being rebuilt
 
Immigration: Departure

Immigration: Arrival


Migration: State Resources

Canadian Resources

 

 

Timeline of important events for American Migration

1500-1800 UK: the population in the British Isles triples in spite of the huge migrations to the New World. This caused huge changes in the work force and agriculture and enclosure of farm lands pushing those who did not have land anywhere they could go.
1517 GER: Martin Luther begins the Reformation
1555 GER: Peace of Augsburg settlement allowed the princes of any province in the Germanic nations to determine the religion of their territories.
1601 UK: The Poor Laws become firmly established in Great Britain (they had first begun under Queen Elizabeth in 1563) - overseers of the poor are appointed - soon each parish would be responsible for the poor in their care and they were to keep records on all of them.  Each town was required to have a prison for the poor to punish beggars and vagabonds
1607 US: First American settlement at Jamestown
1642 UK: Civil War breaks out in England between the King & Parliament 
1649 UK: King of England loses and is beheaded 
1653 UK: Oliver Cromwell named Lord Protector of England - he will have profound impact on Ireland as he invades and sells thousands of Catholic Irish into slavery in the Caribbean
1660 UK: British monarchy is restored under Charles II
1665 UK: Bubonic Plague in England - particularly London
1683 US:The first Germans Mennonites arrive in Pennsylvania
1709 US:The great migration from the Palatine (Germany) arrives in Pennsylvania
1722 UK: England passes legislating that enabled parishes to set up poor houses encouraging them to make them as unpleasant as possible as a "deterrent" to being poor
1782 UK: England passes more legislation allowing you to put the sick and elderly and orphans in the workhouse.
1790 US: Naturalization Act of 1790 - you had to have two year residency to apply
1795 UK: England passes the Speenhamland system which would pay the poor a minimum wage at the expense of the parish who then tried more ways to punish or get rid of them
1798 US: Alien and Sedition acts make 14 year residency for naturalization
1802 US: Naturalization act of 1802 - you had to have residency of 5 years
1806 GER: Napoleon consolidates the principalities of the Rhineland; Prussia and France go to war - Napolean wins
1814 GER: Napoleonic wars end with the Congress of Vienna - outcome for Germany is the German Confederation which consists at that time of 39 independent German states
1840s-1860s US: Potato famine which caused Irish holocaust and great migration but also sent many from Germany, Luxembourg and other European nations
1848 US:Mexican War ends opening up the Southwest
1808 US:Slave trade officially banned
1819 US:Legislation is past demanding the reporting of immigration at all U.S. ports
1819 UK: Britain passes the Passenger Acts making it only cost 15 shillings to go to Canada rather several pounds needed for fare to New York increasing the flow of Scots and English to Canada
1834 UK: Amendment to Britain's poor laws cut off all relief money to anyone who was not able-bodied it made the aged, sick and poor children do terrible work in work-houses and pushed thousands to immigrate to keep family members from starving or children taken to these houses.
1854 US:The Know-Nothing party does its best to stop migrations (particularly Catholic migrations) They were not successful but made things harder on your Irish ancestors
1861 US:Civil War Begins
1862 GER: Otto von Bismark is named prime minister of Prussia
1862 US:Homestead Act
1869 US:Transcontinental Railraod is finished
1870 GER-FRA: Franco Prussian War
1871 GER: Kaiser Wilhelm I crowned in Germany
   
   
   
   
   



 


            

 


 

                                                 Anne Livingston   @WVC Library